Boris to Visit Ghana and The Gambia

The visit is a key demonstration of the interest global powers have in capitalising on West Africa's expansion and development.

With the coming decades promising unmatched growth throughout Africa, an increasing number of global economies are building ties to enhance trade and investment in the continent’s promising future. Boris Johnson, the British Foreign Secretary, recently visited Ghana and The Gambia to discuss bilateral ties and enhance trade and economic cooperation between the countries. The United Kingdom is one of the largest trading partners of both nations, and this visit marks the start of a revolutionary new chapter for West Africa.

Ghana:
One of the most prominent African nations politically and economically is Ghana. Also referred to as “The Gold Coast”, Ghana was one of the first African nations to declare independence. The country has rich resources of oil, gold, and cocoa which make it a leading economic power in West Africa. Ghana has served as a model for African growth. The UK and Ghana have a long and rich history, which is further boosted up by economic cooperation.

The Gambia:
Despite being one of the smaller nations in West Africa, The Gambia has enjoyed significant periods of stability and solid governance. This has made the country a hot spot for tourists, who especially enjoy the resorts located along the western coast. There are also limited agricultural activities and closely related industrial setups that operate in the country. The United Kingdom is one of The Gambia’s largest trading partners, accounting for 90 percent of all exports.

The Importance of This Visit:
Boris Johnson’s visit will start in Gambia, where he will meet the President to discuss key opportunities and methods to address the challenges being faced by the country. Special attention will be paid to the operations and setup of the Medical Research Council which is funded by the United Kingdom. Other activities of the British Foreign Secretary in Gambia will include meetings with tourism sector companies, employers, and Chevening scholars. Mr. Johnson will also discuss Gambia’s proposal to rejoin the Commonwealth.

In Ghana, Mr. Boris Johnson will start off his visit with a meeting with the President. This will be followed by a visit to Blue Skies company and the Department for International Development (DFID) sponsored ENGINE project. This project helps young entrepreneurs to connect with established business leaders in order to market their products and services. The British Foreign Secretary will also hold meetings with key business figures to discuss the prospects of the United Kingdom investing in Ghana.

Conclusion:
The visit is a key demonstration of the interest global powers have in capitalising on West Africa’s expansion and development. It also highlights the importance of developing trade and promoting economic activities whilst supporting entrepreneurs, local industries, and employers to help bring about a positive socioeconomic impact on the nations and all of their people.